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The LTOA - Caring for the Capital's Trees

Welcome to the LTOA website. The London Tree Officers Association (LTOA) constitutes the professional & technical voice for London's trees & woodlands. Its aim is to enhance the management of the Capital's trees. We hope that you find the LTOA website both interesting & informative. If you have any questions, comments or suggestions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

 

​Resilient Woodlands: Meeting the Challenge

The event brings together a unique line up of experts to discuss the questions which impact on all woodland owners and managers, and on everyone who loves or is involved in woodlands – what should we all be doing to ensure our woodlands are resilient to the threat of environmental change?

Full details of the conference, the speakers and how to book are attached, or go to www.rfs.org.uk and follow the conference links. Please circulate the attached to colleagues/members and anyone else you feel would be interested. The conference counts towards CPD for a number of organisations, and  places are limited, so book early!

RFS President Sophie Churchill and The Woodland Trust CEO, Beccy Speight will be chairing the day.

Speakers are: Resilient Landscapes - Mike Townsend, Woodland Trust; Ecological Resilience in Woodlands -  Duncan Stone, Scottish Natural Heritage; Making Woodlands Pay - Graham Taylor, Pryor and Rickett Silviculture; Resilience: a research perspective - Professor Rob MacKenzie , BIFoR; Forest Resilience and Climate Change - Jonathan Spencer, Forestry Commission; Resilience in Living Landscapes - Stephen Trotter, the Wildlife Trusts; Natural Capital - Professor  Dieter Helm, Chairman of Natural Capital Committee (by video); Marketing your Woodland: innovations in wood product markets - Jez Ralph, Timber Strategies; Are pine martens the answer to grey squirrel control? - Dr Tom Tew, Chief Executive Environment Bank and Chairman of Vincent Wildlife Trust; A Practical Guide to taking Action on Resilience - Dr Gabriel Hemery, Sylva Foundation.

​We look forward to seeing you there

Simon Lloyd                                                               Beccy Speight

Chief Executive,                                                        Chief Executive Officer

Royal Forestry Society                                              The Woodland Trust

 

LTOA carried out a survey of Plane trees in 2014 looking for Ceratocystis platani

On behalf of the Forestry Commission, the London Tree Officers' Association (LTOA) surveyed 2,979 London plane trees (Platanus x acerifolia) in 2014 for symptoms of C. platani. Inspections were undertaken at 53 sites across 28 London boroughs. More than half of the sites surveyed included potential hosts planted during the past 10 years, and the sites ranged in size from a minimum of 20 to, in some cases, more than 200 trees. No positive findings of C. platani were detected in any of the trees inspected.

For more information please see this link http://www.forestry.gov.uk/planetreethreats.

 

Confirmed finding of oriental chestnut gall wasp

The tree pest oriental chestnut gall wasp (Dryocosmus kuriphilus) has been confirmed in sweet chestnut trees (Castanea sativa) in a woodland in Kent.

Statement:

A Forestry Commission spokesperson said:

“The oriental chestnut gall wasp has been discovered in one area of Kent.

“This is a pest that only affects sweet chestnut (Castanea) species of tree, and does not pose any risk to people, pets or farm livestock.

“We have launched an immediate investigation of the surrounding woodland and, once we have fully assessed the situation, we will swiftly take any appropriate action.”

Key facts:

  • Oriental chestnut gall wasp is a pest that affects species of sweet chestnut tree. Only European sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa) is grown in significant numbers in Britain, and no other tree species in Britain is affected.
  • The Forestry Commission is undertaking a full survey and analysis to determine the scale of the current outbreak and the potential cause of the outbreak.
  • Once we have fully assessed the situation, we will swiftly take any appropriate action.
  • Oriental chestnut gall wasp is a threat to sweet chestnuts in several regions of the world. It reduces nut production and can weaken the tree, leaving it vulnerable to other diseases.
  • The UK has Protected Zone Status against this pest, and the plant health services must be notified of all pending imports of sweet chestnut planting material before its arrival in the UK so that a proportion can be inspected.
  • As part of investigations into the outbreak, the new Observatree group of trained volunteers have agreed to help survey more widely for evidence of the pest.

A full statement has been published on our website at www.forestry.gov.uk/gallwasp, and will be updated as the situation evolves. The affected woodland is Farningham Woods, near Sevenoaks, Kent.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The website should answer most questions you might have, but:

 

London Tree and Woodland Awards

On the 27th May 2015, London City Hall hosted a celebratory awards event to celebrate the work of individuals, communities and professionals to protect, improve and expand the capital’s tree and woodland cover.

Roger Evans (Deputy Mayor) and Ian Gambles (Forestry Commission England Director) attended the event and congratulated everyone in London for their hard work.

Andy Tipping with the London Borough of Barnet award Jonathan Robinson with his Trees & Technology award Jim Smith with his LTOA Individual Commitment award

LTOA members who won an award were:

Street Tree 2008-2015 Award:

London Borough of Barnet - A5 Edgware Road tree planting project.

The A5 Edgware Road tree planting project in Barnet involved the planting of 89 Dawn redwoods trees along a very busy road, having a transformative impact on the local environment and expected economic regeneration benefits.

The Trees and Technology Award:

Jonathan Robinson for his development of the Open Source Canopy Cover Audit application

For developing this innovative software in his own time. It is very simple and effective for users, to help understand the amount of canopy cover over a chosen area.

The London Tree Officers Association Individual Commitment Award:

Jim Smith

The LTOA Executive Committee awarded Jim for the years of hard work promoting Trees in London and for championing the important works that tree officers undertake.

 

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How to become a member

Join the LTOA

Members can attend, for free, the the LTOA meetings which are held four times a year and cover a wide range of tree related matters. Click here to find out how to become an associate member

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Become a Member

Join the LTOA

Members can attend, for free, the the LTOA meetings which are held four times a year and cover a wide range of tree related matters. Click here to find out how to become an associate member

 

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